2016 11 02 4767The Vatican has set out guidelines for Catholics who want to be cremated, saying their remains cannot be scattered, divided up or kept at home but rather stored in a sacred, Church-approved place.

The new instructions were released by the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith.

For most of its 2,000-year history, the Catholic Church only permitted burial, arguing that this best expressed the Christian hope in resurrection. But in 1963, the Vatican explicitly allowed cremation as long as it didn’t suggest a denial of faith about resurrection.

The new document repeats that burial remains preferred but lays out guidelines for conserving ashes for the increasing numbers of Catholics who choose cremation.

It said it was doing so to counter what it called “new ideas contrary to the Church’s faith” that had emerged since 1963, including New Age ideas that death is a “fusion” with Mother Nature and the universe, or the “definitive liberation” from the prison of the body.

The Vatican said ashes and bone fragments cannot be kept at home, since that would deprive the Christian community as a whole from remembering the dead. Rather, Church authorities should designate a sacred place, such as a cemetery or church area, to hold them.

Only in extraordinary cases can a bishop allow ashes to be kept at home, it said.

The document said remains cannot be divided among family members or put in lockets or other mementoes. Nor can the ashes be scattered in the air, land or sea since doing so would give the appearance of “pantheism, naturalism or nihilism,” the guidelines said.

To read the full article go to Catholic Herald.  For a similar article refer to The Guardian.